A 20-year-old will clean up the world's oceans

Boyan Slat is a 20-year-old from the Netherlands. He thinks he knows how to clean up the global ocean quickly

Eight million tons of plastic waste enter the ocean every year. And nobody knows how to clean that up... except for Boyan Slat, a 20-year-old from the Netherlands and founder of the Ocean Cleanup program, who thinks he knows how to clean up the global ocean quickly. The Ocean Cleanup program should be "The Largest Cleanup In History," using a passive system to collect plastic debris floating in the oceans. Yes, passive: "Why move through the oceans if the ocean can move for you, by fixing the platforms to the sea bed and letting the rotating current do their work?" Boyan said. The Ocean Cleanup will be launched in 2016. The first device will be over 6,560 feet (2 Km) long, and will be the longest floating structure in history. It will be deployed in waters between Japan and South Korea and will act as a barrier trapping floating debris. Ships will be able to pick up the garbage, making use of a conveyor belt 7,900 times faster than current methods. The costs? Just about 3% of the current ones.
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Taking care of the world's ocean garbage problem is one of the largest environmental challenges mankind faces today.
In two years, Boyan intends to launch a version of his device about 62.5 miles (100 Km) long. This barrier will be set in waters between Hawaii and California. "Taking care of the world's ocean garbage problem is one of the largest environmental challenges mankind faces today. Not only will this first cleanup array contribute to cleaner waters and coasts, but it simultaneously is an essential step towards our goal of cleaning up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. This deployment will enable us to study the system's efficiency and durability over time," Boyan said.